. Visit our section on the passive for advice on when to use the passive and when to substitute more active verb forms. The verb “To be” most frequently works in conjunction with another verb: “He is playing the piano,” “She will be arriving this afternoon.” Occasionally, though, the verb will stand by itself, alone, in a sentence. For instance, the police might report that “The professor was assaulted in the hallways” because they do not know the perpetrator of this heinous crime. The simple verb (in parentheses) is usually better: Many such wordy constructions are more naturally phrased in the present-tense singular: "is able to" ("can"), "is authorized to" the musical number from "To Be or Not to Be" that mocks Hitler's policy of Lebensraum [ The verb to be - yes / no questions ] google_color_text = "000000"; google_ad_type = "text_image"; Thus, “She is being a good worker” (because she chooses to be so), but we would say “She is (not is being) an Olympic athlete” (because once she becomes an athlete she no longer “wills it”). google_ad_client = "pub-6676379291085385"; (Don't try to make sense of this last construction. *Understanding English Grammar by Martha Kolln. On the other hand, expletive constructions do give us an interesting means of setting out or organizing the work of a subsequent paragraph: Verb phrases containing "be" verbs are often merely roundabout ways of saying something better said with a simple verb. He wasn't widely accepted in this country at first. It: is not: my book. MacMillan Publishing Company: New York. You: are not: a shop assistant. . Visit our section on the passive for advice on when to use the passive and when to substitute more active verb forms. The verb “To be” most frequently works in conjunction with another verb: “He is playing the piano,” “She will be arriving this afternoon.” Occasionally, though, the verb will stand by itself, alone, in a sentence. For instance, the police might report that “The professor was assaulted in the hallways” because they do not know the perpetrator of this heinous crime. The simple verb (in parentheses) is usually better: Many such wordy constructions are more naturally phrased in the present-tense singular: "is able to" ("can"), "is authorized to" the musical number from "To Be or Not to Be" that mocks Hitler's policy of Lebensraum [ The verb to be - yes / no questions ] google_color_text = "000000"; google_ad_type = "text_image"; Thus, “She is being a good worker” (because she chooses to be so), but we would say “She is (not is being) an Olympic athlete” (because once she becomes an athlete she no longer “wills it”). google_ad_client = "pub-6676379291085385"; (Don't try to make sense of this last construction. *Understanding English Grammar by Martha Kolln. On the other hand, expletive constructions do give us an interesting means of setting out or organizing the work of a subsequent paragraph: Verb phrases containing "be" verbs are often merely roundabout ways of saying something better said with a simple verb. He wasn't widely accepted in this country at first. It: is not: my book. MacMillan Publishing Company: New York. You: are not: a shop assistant.

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to be or not to be

google_ad_format = "300x250_as"; To be exercises: present simple affirmative forms. More activities on the Eclectic English Home Page. There were four underlying causes of World War I. 1997. There were several typographical errors in this anthology. English verbs. positive sentences with the verb to be. . Visit our section on the passive for advice on when to use the passive and when to substitute more active verb forms. The verb “To be” most frequently works in conjunction with another verb: “He is playing the piano,” “She will be arriving this afternoon.” Occasionally, though, the verb will stand by itself, alone, in a sentence. For instance, the police might report that “The professor was assaulted in the hallways” because they do not know the perpetrator of this heinous crime. The simple verb (in parentheses) is usually better: Many such wordy constructions are more naturally phrased in the present-tense singular: "is able to" ("can"), "is authorized to" the musical number from "To Be or Not to Be" that mocks Hitler's policy of Lebensraum [ The verb to be - yes / no questions ] google_color_text = "000000"; google_ad_type = "text_image"; Thus, “She is being a good worker” (because she chooses to be so), but we would say “She is (not is being) an Olympic athlete” (because once she becomes an athlete she no longer “wills it”). google_ad_client = "pub-6676379291085385"; (Don't try to make sense of this last construction. *Understanding English Grammar by Martha Kolln. On the other hand, expletive constructions do give us an interesting means of setting out or organizing the work of a subsequent paragraph: Verb phrases containing "be" verbs are often merely roundabout ways of saying something better said with a simple verb. He wasn't widely accepted in this country at first. It: is not: my book. MacMillan Publishing Company: New York. You: are not: a shop assistant.

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